All posts filed under: Arts

Ho Ho Oh? Archaeologists find tomb of St Nicholas in Turkey | Neos Kosmos

A recent archaeological discovery underneath a Turkish church could shed light on the mysterious whereabouts of St Nicholas A recent discovery of a tomb in the Church of St Nicholas in Demre, Antalya is believed to be that of St Nicholas – the man, the mystery and the legend that created Santa Claus. While conducting “geo-radar surveys” of the 11th Century church as part of a restoration process, archaeologists came across an in-tact temple below the church. Cemil Karabyram, head of Antalya’s Monument Authority told the International Business Times the team believes the “shrine has not been damaged at all” but due to the intricate mosaic pattern on the floor it will be “quite difficult to get to it”. But the archaeologists will continue to find their way to the temple without damaging the Church. The whereabouts of St Nicholas has always been a mystery, as historical records have suggested that he was buried in Myra but his bones were stolen and taken to the portside town of Bari, the capital of Puglia, where St …

Interview with Alex Chinneck | fluoro

You probably wouldn’t believe that a building could melt, be built upside down, or be split into two with its top half somehow levitating. An electricity pylon couldn’t just fall from the sky, and 312 windows could never be identically smashed. The thing is, they can, and have. They’ve been brought to life by London-based artist Alex Chinneck. Chinneck’s work is renowned for its ambitious scale and illusory nature. They are largely cross-disciplinary and cross-technical – architectural processes intertwining with sculptural processes, and engineering with art. The results are nothing short from magnificent. His piece From the Knees of my Nose to the Belly of my Toes, or the ‘sliding house’, as it’s more commonly known, saw the façade of a home in Margate replaced with a brick front. It gave the impression that it was somehow sliding into the front garden. The detached four-storey house had been derelict for 11 years, had fallen into ruin, and Chinneck’s project was a kind of cultural or artistic rejuvenation not only of the building, but the area itself. The …

Focus on the Unfocused: Alex Garant | fluoro

Canadian pop surrealist artist and Queen of Double Eyes Alex Garant, creates pieces that are about focusing on the unfocused. Employing the use of pattern duplication, symmetry and image superstition, particularly of eyes, her pieces can almost discombobulate the viewers, as it is difficult to focus on the true face of each subject. Garant says she has always been fascinated by symmetry and patterns, or “anything that makes the eyes travel over an image repeatedly.” The more she played with duplication of elements the more she found the vibrating effect that was created by overlaying images so positively stimulating. Portraits are her modus operandi, ultimately vivid and assertively striking. She captures a certain stillness from her subjects – they are looking towards us, but it is the eyes (and some other facial features) and the way Garant multiplies and overlaps them that seem to be communicating various messages. “Eyes are the window to the soul. This is how we communicate,” says Garant. “I like to think that the viewers shall try to unearth the main figure by focusing on …

Cuba: Black and White by Anna Mia Davidson | fluoro

Photographer Anna Mia Davidson has released her latest book, Cuba: Black and White, a series of photographs taken during her time in Cuba. Her photos tell the story of a turbulent time in during the beginning of the ban of trade and travel between Cuba and the United States. A break in diplomatic relations ultimately created a de facto embargo on information about Cuba. “As a young activist, I questioned the morality of the US embargo against Cuba. I was eager to find the positive in a country that I was forbidden to travel to by my government,” said Davidson. In 1999, at just 25 years old, Davidson made her way to Cuba to capture the Cuban people’s perspective. Ultimately, she was in search of the positive in an otherwise bureaucratically dismal situation, and although encountering moments that caused her to shift her thinking at times what she found rising to the surface was the spirit and resilience of the Cuban people. And the photos of Cuba: Black and Whitedepicted the spirit, the resilience, and the beauty …

Interview with Eero Aarnio | fluoro

There are few things that can define an era. Then there are fewer things not only that define an era but also seep into those succeeding it, and retain valuable cultural currency. A concept released in 1962 caused a stir and remains relevant to this day. It was the Ball Chair. A hollow sphere sliced on one side, giving the feeling to whoever is inside that they are, as the name suggests, sitting in a bubble. The design quickly gained momentum for its unusual style and it became a staple for many homes. The 60s embraced it, and it became a design phenomenon. The designer behind it all was Eero Aarnio. After studying architecture in Helsinki, Finland, Aarnio worked as a product designer for the largest furniture factory in Finland: Asko. He also worked for famed Finnish designers Ilmari Tapiovaara, who designed furniture for the Finnish army, and Antti Nurmesniemi known for his horse-shoe stool and his coffee pots. The two designers influenced Aarnio and taught him how to remain focused in design. “While working …

Yoko Ono: Lumière de l’aube | fluoro

In 1971 Yoko Ono placed an advert in the New York Times announcing her exhibition, a one-woman show, at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). In her catalogue for the show, she was depicted standing in-front of MoMA, its logo prominent in the foreground, but just before the “A” there was a drop in the sign causing one to look down to see Ono standing, holding a bag with the letter “F” on it. The Museum of Modern Fart was the not-so-accidental title of this fake exhibition that was supposedly based on a jar of flies released in the air by Ono, their journey documented by a photographer. When visitors arrived at MoMA, however, they would see the advert taped to the ticket window, underneath reading in Ono’s handwriting, “this is not here.” Moving to New York City in 1953, Ono established a relationship with gallery owner George Maciunas of Fluxus, where Ono later held her first solo exhibition. Only five people attended, including John Cage. Although the trial, tribulations and controversies that surrounded Ono after she married …

How To Order An Extraordinary Cup of Coffee

For many Melburnians coffee is essentially the elixir of the Gods. The velvety milk, or the glorious golden crema of an espresso, our baristas are artists in their own rights, steaming, frothing and pulling hundreds of their pieces de resistance for the grateful masses. But how do you ensure that you always order a coffee that will actually be good? I asked some coffee aficionados from Sydney Coffee Academy, Muffin Break, Jamaica Blue, and local baristas to help you order the right brew anywhere, every time. Sam Taylor, teacher and course coordinator of the professional Barista course at Sydney Coffee Academy says that the consumer can be part of the process as well. “Communicating how you’d like your coffee is of vital importance, poor communication or equally poor understanding from the barista will result in an ineffective outcome,” said Sam. It’s better to form a relationship with your barista. “Chat to your barista and engage with how they feel their product is best made and how that can be moulded to suit your taste,” he said. Jeremy Regan …

Why A Liberal Arts Degree Is Something of Value

On June 28th a mellifluous baritone snaked through the air in the auditorium I was sat in. I turned around and saw a handsome young man with an elderly companion. They accommodated themselves in their allocated leathery residence and continued their tête-à-tête. “So what did you study?” asked the lady “I will say what I say to everyone: I studied a multidisciplinary Arts degree.” he replied. The dialogue that ensued was something that I heard countless times before, something in the vein of he had commenced his Arts degree, selected a fairly broad range of courses which culminated majoring in Art history. Today, exclaimed, he is yet to find a job. It has been reported for years now that enrolments in Bachelor of Arts have decreased, a simple chat to any student frequently yields the same opinion: arts degrees are broad degrees which result in very few career options. This, in fact, is a broad notion, which, to be frank lacks a substantial and intricate understanding that how the arts degree is actually structured does indeed provide great …

“There is no friend as loyal as a book.”

On this day, July 2, 1961, in Ketchum, Idaho, USA, the sound of a single gunshot echoed in the Hemingway home: Ernest Hemingway, the Nobel and Pulitzer prize winner had accidentally shot himself while cleaning his 12-gauge shotgun. The gun was found next to a robe-clad Hemingway, and Mary had to be sedated from her distress. It was a great loss to the Hemingway family, and a great loss to the literary world. It seems as though anything I would write in this anniversary post would seem somewhat clichéd and overdone. So instead, I’ve compiled some photos taken throughout Hemingway’s life to celebrate the unique individual that he was. Whenever I read his work, I am always imbued with a greater sense of meaning which facilitates coping with existential threat. Hemingway’s work is like an existential bandaid, if you will…I guess that just means his books make me happy. Photo Credit: JFK Library Hemingway Collection