All posts tagged: art

Interview with Alex Chinneck | fluoro

You probably wouldn’t believe that a building could melt, be built upside down, or be split into two with its top half somehow levitating. An electricity pylon couldn’t just fall from the sky, and 312 windows could never be identically smashed. The thing is, they can, and have. They’ve been brought to life by London-based artist Alex Chinneck. Chinneck’s work is renowned for its ambitious scale and illusory nature. They are largely cross-disciplinary and cross-technical – architectural processes intertwining with sculptural processes, and engineering with art. The results are nothing short from magnificent. His piece From the Knees of my Nose to the Belly of my Toes, or the ‘sliding house’, as it’s more commonly known, saw the façade of a home in Margate replaced with a brick front. It gave the impression that it was somehow sliding into the front garden. The detached four-storey house had been derelict for 11 years, had fallen into ruin, and Chinneck’s project was a kind of cultural or artistic rejuvenation not only of the building, but the area itself. The …

Focus on the Unfocused: Alex Garant | fluoro

Canadian pop surrealist artist and Queen of Double Eyes Alex Garant, creates pieces that are about focusing on the unfocused. Employing the use of pattern duplication, symmetry and image superstition, particularly of eyes, her pieces can almost discombobulate the viewers, as it is difficult to focus on the true face of each subject. Garant says she has always been fascinated by symmetry and patterns, or “anything that makes the eyes travel over an image repeatedly.” The more she played with duplication of elements the more she found the vibrating effect that was created by overlaying images so positively stimulating. Portraits are her modus operandi, ultimately vivid and assertively striking. She captures a certain stillness from her subjects – they are looking towards us, but it is the eyes (and some other facial features) and the way Garant multiplies and overlaps them that seem to be communicating various messages. “Eyes are the window to the soul. This is how we communicate,” says Garant. “I like to think that the viewers shall try to unearth the main figure by focusing on …

Cuba: Black and White by Anna Mia Davidson | fluoro

Photographer Anna Mia Davidson has released her latest book, Cuba: Black and White, a series of photographs taken during her time in Cuba. Her photos tell the story of a turbulent time in during the beginning of the ban of trade and travel between Cuba and the United States. A break in diplomatic relations ultimately created a de facto embargo on information about Cuba. “As a young activist, I questioned the morality of the US embargo against Cuba. I was eager to find the positive in a country that I was forbidden to travel to by my government,” said Davidson. In 1999, at just 25 years old, Davidson made her way to Cuba to capture the Cuban people’s perspective. Ultimately, she was in search of the positive in an otherwise bureaucratically dismal situation, and although encountering moments that caused her to shift her thinking at times what she found rising to the surface was the spirit and resilience of the Cuban people. And the photos of Cuba: Black and Whitedepicted the spirit, the resilience, and the beauty …

Yoko Ono: Lumière de l’aube | fluoro

In 1971 Yoko Ono placed an advert in the New York Times announcing her exhibition, a one-woman show, at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). In her catalogue for the show, she was depicted standing in-front of MoMA, its logo prominent in the foreground, but just before the “A” there was a drop in the sign causing one to look down to see Ono standing, holding a bag with the letter “F” on it. The Museum of Modern Fart was the not-so-accidental title of this fake exhibition that was supposedly based on a jar of flies released in the air by Ono, their journey documented by a photographer. When visitors arrived at MoMA, however, they would see the advert taped to the ticket window, underneath reading in Ono’s handwriting, “this is not here.” Moving to New York City in 1953, Ono established a relationship with gallery owner George Maciunas of Fluxus, where Ono later held her first solo exhibition. Only five people attended, including John Cage. Although the trial, tribulations and controversies that surrounded Ono after she married …

Amsterdam

Amsterdam: A City of Creation | fluoro

“I see drawings and pictures in the poorest of huts and dirtiest of corners.” – Vincent Van Gogh Amsterdam. A city renowned for its culture, history, art and UNESCO world heritage listed canals, will see a surge in creative events this month with the renowned Amsterdam Art Weekend and International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam (IDFA) taking place in locations around the city. A walk around the Herengracht, Prinsengracht or Keizergracht – Amsterdam’s three main canals, will weave you through what the Dutch city has to offer. The tightly packed canal house gables, icons in their own architectural right, display the mastery of Dutch architecture from the 16th to 20thCenturies. They are richly decorated and among them we see other important buildings such as the Westerkerk Tower and DAM Square, a nod to the artistic values that Amsterdam is renowned for. A vivid arts scene where one can listen to the world renowned Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra or visit the Van Gogh Museum, or for that matter, any of the 140 galleries or 40 museums that the city …

paris, eiffel tower

Things To Do in Paris (on Your First Visit)

Climbing atop La Tour Eiffel and Arc de Triomphe are necessities. Entering and leaving Paris without doing this would be a travesty. It is but a natural movement to make when in Paris. The lines here at these monuments are always long, but never take as much time as you would think. So don’t leave thinking you can come back at a better time. Make your way up top where you will have one of the greatest views of Paris’s iconic city layout, and when you reach the summit of the Eiffel Tower, indulge in a little bit of champagne. And don’t forget Sacre Coeur in Montmartre. In fact, Montmartre itself is a unique little portion of Paris. It’s old town aesthetic, rustic pastel buildings and cobblestone pathways make it an essential place of interest. Where to go La Tour Eiffel, Champ de Mars, 5 Avenue Anatole France, 75007 L’Arc De Triomphe, Place Charles de Gaulle, 75008 Sacre Coeur, 35 Rue du Chevalier de la Barre, 75018 While the Louvre is home to some of the world’s most …

Routines of Successful Writers

Although I’m pretty certain there is no answer to it, I sometimes secretly tend to question whether there is a panacea for good writing. This got me thinking about the habits of successful writers and what kinds of routines they go through to produce work that they deem valuable. Here are some writers’ routines which I found by digging through the wonderful The Art of Fiction Archives from The Paris Review: Haruki Murakami keeps to a very tight routine when writing. He explains that he attempts to keep himself mesmerised, so he can stay wholly immersed in his work and state of mind. When I’m in writing mode for a novel, I get up at four a.m. and work for five to six hours. In the afternoon, I run for ten kilometers or swim for fifteen hundred meters (or do both), then I read a bit and listen to some music. I go to bed at nine p.m. I keep to this routine every day without variation. The repetition itself becomes the important thing; it’s a …

Picasso’s Light Drawings, 1949

When two creative minds unite and create something, the results are always more than likely purely fascinating. This is exactly what happened when LIFE magazine photograhper Gjon Mili showed Pablo Picasso his work. It sparked something in Picasso’s mind, and then suddenly like a quick lightning strike, they cam up with the idea of drawing with light. Picasso to draw, Mili to capture. The results were extraordinary. But how were they achieved? In the LIFE magazine feature, it explains: This series of photographs, known ever since as Picasso’s “light drawings,” were made with a small electric light in a darkened room; in effect, the images vanished as soon as they were created — and yet they still live, six decades later, in Mili’s playful, hypnotic images. Many of them were also put on display in early 1950 in a show at New York’s Museum of Modern Art. All images via LIFE magazine by Gjon Mili

A Neurological Defence for the Humanities: Better Thinking, Bigger Ideas and Art

It is widely noted that Einstein came up with some of his best scientific ideas during his violin breaks, which he believed connected different parts of his brain in new ways. It’s the thinking process which Einstein coined as “combinatory play”. This is the notion that creativity is combinational: humans amass a collection of cross-disciplinary building blocks — knowledge, memories, etc, and then combine and recombine into something new. From this mental pool of resources beckons the infrastructure of what we call our own original ideas.