All posts tagged: Hemingway

“There is no friend as loyal as a book.”

On this day, July 2, 1961, in Ketchum, Idaho, USA, the sound of a single gunshot echoed in the Hemingway home: Ernest Hemingway, the Nobel and Pulitzer prize winner had accidentally shot himself while cleaning his 12-gauge shotgun. The gun was found next to a robe-clad Hemingway, and Mary had to be sedated from her distress. It was a great loss to the Hemingway family, and a great loss to the literary world. It seems as though anything I would write in this anniversary post would seem somewhat clichéd and overdone. So instead, I’ve compiled some photos taken throughout Hemingway’s life to celebrate the unique individual that he was. Whenever I read his work, I am always imbued with a greater sense of meaning which facilitates coping with existential threat. Hemingway’s work is like an existential bandaid, if you will…I guess that just means his books make me happy. Photo Credit: JFK Library Hemingway Collection Advertisements

Routines of Successful Writers

Although I’m pretty certain there is no answer to it, I sometimes secretly tend to question whether there is a panacea for good writing. This got me thinking about the habits of successful writers and what kinds of routines they go through to produce work that they deem valuable. Here are some writers’ routines which I found by digging through the wonderful The Art of Fiction Archives from The Paris Review: Haruki Murakami keeps to a very tight routine when writing. He explains that he attempts to keep himself mesmerised, so he can stay wholly immersed in his work and state of mind. When I’m in writing mode for a novel, I get up at four a.m. and work for five to six hours. In the afternoon, I run for ten kilometers or swim for fifteen hundred meters (or do both), then I read a bit and listen to some music. I go to bed at nine p.m. I keep to this routine every day without variation. The repetition itself becomes the important thing; it’s a …

Failures of the Greats: Why You’re Doing Better than You Think (Plus 17 Writing Tips from Some Greats)

Before having This Side of Paradise published, Francis Scott Fitzgerald claimed he had received one hundred and twenty-two rejection letters. He then spent two months rewriting The Romantic Egoist, retitling it to This Side of Paradise and sent it to his publishers. Within two weeks he received a special delivery form the editor, reading: