All posts tagged: literature

“There is no friend as loyal as a book.”

On this day, July 2, 1961, in Ketchum, Idaho, USA, the sound of a single gunshot echoed in the Hemingway home: Ernest Hemingway, the Nobel and Pulitzer prize winner had accidentally shot himself while cleaning his 12-gauge shotgun. The gun was found next to a robe-clad Hemingway, and Mary had to be sedated from her distress. It was a great loss to the Hemingway family, and a great loss to the literary world. It seems as though anything I would write in this anniversary post would seem somewhat clichéd and overdone. So instead, I’ve compiled some photos taken throughout Hemingway’s life to celebrate the unique individual that he was. Whenever I read his work, I am always imbued with a greater sense of meaning which facilitates coping with existential threat. Hemingway’s work is like an existential bandaid, if you will…I guess that just means his books make me happy. Photo Credit: JFK Library Hemingway Collection

The Empathy Deficit and Books: Why Reading Books Can Make Us Better People | Warhol’s Children

In 1909 psychologist Edward Titchener introduced the term empathy into the English language as the translation of the German term Einfühlung, meaning “feeling into”. At this time in the 19th century, however, the term pertained to the thinking of philosophical aesthetics. Romantic thinkers viewed empathy as one’s ability to “feel into” nature and art, proposing that it was a remedy for the scientific attitude of impassively dissecting nature into its elements. It was then the work of Professor Theodor Lipps which transformed empathy from a concept of philosophical aesthetics into a more psychological concept.