All posts tagged: musings

Why A Liberal Arts Degree Is Something of Value

On June 28th a mellifluous baritone snaked through the air in the auditorium I was sat in. I turned around and saw a handsome young man with an elderly companion. They accommodated themselves in their allocated leathery residence and continued their tête-à-tête. “So what did you study?” asked the lady “I will say what I say to everyone: I studied a multidisciplinary Arts degree.” he replied. The dialogue that ensued was something that I heard countless times before, something in the vein of he had commenced his Arts degree, selected a fairly broad range of courses which culminated majoring in Art history. Today, exclaimed, he is yet to find a job. It has been reported for years now that enrolments in Bachelor of Arts have decreased, a simple chat to any student frequently yields the same opinion: arts degrees are broad degrees which result in very few career options. This, in fact, is a broad notion, which, to be frank lacks a substantial and intricate understanding that how the arts degree is actually structured does indeed provide great …

Ralph Waldo Emerson, Virginia Woolf and Susan Sontag On The Beginning of an Idea

“Boredom is a function of attention,” wrote Susan Sontag in As Consciousness Is Harnessed to Flesh: Journals and Notebooks, 1964-1980. There are creative benefits to be found in being bored, for Sontag there was also creative influence from reading because it stalled her from writing. “Stalling by way of reading and of listening to music, which energizes me and also makes me restless. Feeling guilty about not writing.” “Getting started to write is never an easy feat. The handsome devil that is procrastination can play a recurring role for many writers, much like the overwhelming sense of having too many ideas and not knowing where to start. Add to that the relatively unquenchable desire of discovery of new things to enlarge not only our minds, but our hearts also.” But where do our ideas come from? This got me thinking about other writers and what the beginning of an idea looks like. I came across this extract from Ralph Waldo Emerson’s journal, “Saw the morn rise from the hilltop but could not wait for the sun. Those long slender bard of …

20 Words That Don’t Exist

1. When something finally clicks, and everything just makes sense. 2. The exact time you remember that word that was on the tip of your tongue. 3. The very moment you open your eyes when you wake up. 3. The thought that leads you into a daydream and then realising that you were daydreaming. 4. When you read something written by someone else which exactly describes what you’re feeling. 5. When two people look at each other and just know what the other is thinking. This is often followed by a mutual action. 6. The feeling of having a feeling. 7. Finally realising that something you once found imperfect or flawed, is imperfectly perfect — is beautiful. 8. Wanting to express something but not knowing what. 9. To be happy for someone else’s success or good fortune. 10. Finding the right words at the right time, and saying the right thing at the right time. 11. A craving for a perfect cup of coffee. 12. The frustration of accepting something you don’t want to; accepting defeat. Not ceding, …

lesjardin du luxembourg

Midnight Collection

Oftentimes I somehow mentally transport myself into 1920s Paris. The beaded flapper dresses, the Charleston, bouteilles des vins rouges, Scott Fitzgerald and dimly lit brasseries — these are all things and aesthetics that I would like to have experienced. Obviously, it shall never be. However when Midnight in Paris came out it replenished my 20s era deficiency. (and also acquainted me with another understanding of why artists create: to help find an antidote to the emptiness of existence. These words were uttered by the Gertrude Stein character, addressing the real Stein’s views of what she called the Lost Generation.) I found it to be a great script, and these are some of the quotes that I thought were wonderful: quotes from Midnight In Paris by Woody Allen.   “Nostalgia is denial. Denial of the painful present.” — Paul “You have a glazed look in your eye. Stunned, stupefied, anesthetized, lobotomized” — Zelda Fitzgerald “No subject is terrible if the story is true. If the prose is clean and honest and if it affirms courage and grace under pressure.” — Ernest Hemingway [regarding Gil’s book] “If it’s …