All posts tagged: study

The Creative Benefits of Walking

From an early age Rousseau developed a passion for walking; finding delight especially from the journeys guided by chance: peripatetic randomness, or what he calls, “the pleasures of going one knows not where.” Such walks allowed his mind to wander as he penned in his Reveries of the Solitary Walker, where we are introduced to 10 ‘walks’ from Rousseau’s autobiographical musings toward the end of his life. Through his walks, Rousseau delved deep into self-reflection and self-analysis, rejoicing in his freedom to “converse with [his] soul.” “There is something about walking that animates and activates my ideas; I can hardly think when I am still; my body must move if mind is to do the same,” wrote Rousseau. Fast forward to 2014 where French Philosopher Frederic Gros released his book A Philosophy of Walking and he also speaks of the mind-freeing quality of walking. “A long walk,” writes Gros, “allows us to commune with the sublime,” he penned. He notes the flaneur, coming from French meaning to stroll or to lounge, the casual saunter, roaming the many pathways of a city, observing, musing, …

Why A Liberal Arts Degree Is Something of Value

On June 28th a mellifluous baritone snaked through the air in the auditorium I was sat in. I turned around and saw a handsome young man with an elderly companion. They accommodated themselves in their allocated leathery residence and continued their tête-à-tête. “So what did you study?” asked the lady “I will say what I say to everyone: I studied a multidisciplinary Arts degree.” he replied. The dialogue that ensued was something that I heard countless times before, something in the vein of he had commenced his Arts degree, selected a fairly broad range of courses which culminated majoring in Art history. Today, exclaimed, he is yet to find a job. It has been reported for years now that enrolments in Bachelor of Arts have decreased, a simple chat to any student frequently yields the same opinion: arts degrees are broad degrees which result in very few career options. This, in fact, is a broad notion, which, to be frank lacks a substantial and intricate understanding that how the arts degree is actually structured does indeed provide great …

Outsiders and Creative Thinking | Warhol’s Children

In a 2012 study it was found that social rejection propels creativity for those with an independent self-concept. That is, people who place less of a premium on sharing more similarities with major social groups, rather than opting for a more individualistic approach. 3 studies were conducted. In the first, participants were rejected outright and informed they had to work on their tasks individually. They then indicated how they felt (pretty rejected). In the second rejection was primed by requiring students to circle pronouns (“I”, “my”) and vice versa for the interdependent version (“We”, “our”). Results showed that the participants who had an independent self-concept, and who were rejected, produced more creative responses for their test, more so than included participants. The final study showed how these variables influence idea generation by completing a space alien drawing — the more the drawing diverted from conventional structures (nose in the middle of the face etc), the more creative. Again, independent thinkers generated more creative drawings following rejection, than following inclusion. “Rejection relative to inclusion appears to …