All posts tagged: university

Professor Profiles: Professor Ghil’ad Zuckermann

From the age of four and throughout his youth, Professor Ghil’ad Zuckermann was considered a mathematical prodigy, but always felt that it did not have the soul, social interaction and emotional intelligence that languages have. “I might be wrong but I was certain,” said Professor Zuckermann from his Adelaide University office. He has always been interested in languages, both Language (with a capital L) and languages, and has always been ludic and playful with words. He used to write palindromic stories and bilingual homophonous poems, which are now widely found on the Internet. “Children’s writer Russell Hoban described language as an ‘archaeological vehicle’, full of the remnants of dead and living pasts, lost and buried civilisations and technologies. The language we speak is a whole palimpsest of human effort and history,” quoted Professor Zuckermann by heart. He shifted in his chair, gesticulating gently, and explained that palimpsest is a beautiful metaphor for language.Coming from Greek,it means ‘scraped again’, ‘re-scratched,’ referring to a text written on top of another text. “A language is multi-layered, it encodes …

The Creative Benefits of Walking

From an early age Rousseau developed a passion for walking; finding delight especially from the journeys guided by chance: peripatetic randomness, or what he calls, “the pleasures of going one knows not where.” Such walks allowed his mind to wander as he penned in his Reveries of the Solitary Walker, where we are introduced to 10 ‘walks’ from Rousseau’s autobiographical musings toward the end of his life. Through his walks, Rousseau delved deep into self-reflection and self-analysis, rejoicing in his freedom to “converse with [his] soul.” “There is something about walking that animates and activates my ideas; I can hardly think when I am still; my body must move if mind is to do the same,” wrote Rousseau. Fast forward to 2014 where French Philosopher Frederic Gros released his book A Philosophy of Walking and he also speaks of the mind-freeing quality of walking. “A long walk,” writes Gros, “allows us to commune with the sublime,” he penned. He notes the flaneur, coming from French meaning to stroll or to lounge, the casual saunter, roaming the many pathways of a city, observing, musing, …

Why A Liberal Arts Degree Is Something of Value

On June 28th a mellifluous baritone snaked through the air in the auditorium I was sat in. I turned around and saw a handsome young man with an elderly companion. They accommodated themselves in their allocated leathery residence and continued their tête-à-tête. “So what did you study?” asked the lady “I will say what I say to everyone: I studied a multidisciplinary Arts degree.” he replied. The dialogue that ensued was something that I heard countless times before, something in the vein of he had commenced his Arts degree, selected a fairly broad range of courses which culminated majoring in Art history. Today, exclaimed, he is yet to find a job. It has been reported for years now that enrolments in Bachelor of Arts have decreased, a simple chat to any student frequently yields the same opinion: arts degrees are broad degrees which result in very few career options. This, in fact, is a broad notion, which, to be frank lacks a substantial and intricate understanding that how the arts degree is actually structured does indeed provide great …

Making Your Bed Can Help You Achieve Your Goals

If you want to make it big, you’ve got to start small. Jumping in the deep end will often leave us startled and gasping for air, so we start in the shallow end, we gain confidence, and we move forward. We graduate, and after that, there’s no stopping us. That’s how we can change the world in our own little way. A speech given by Naval Adm. William H. McRaven to the graduating students at the University of Texas explains that we can change the world by starting with a small task everyday: just by making our beds in the morning. If you make your bed every morning you will have accomplished the first task of the day.  It will give you a small sense of pride and it will encourage you to do another task and another and another. By the end of the day, that one task completed will have turned into many tasks completed. Making your bed will also reinforce the fact that little things in life matter. If you can’t do the little things right, …

Benefits of Postgraduate Communications Courses | Hot Courses

A communications course is an increasingly popular choice among undergraduates, but as there are more and more graduates, there may be little which lets them stand out from the crowd. A postgraduate course in communications could make all the difference.  Deciding whether or not to undertake postgraduate study may prove a difficult task, but you can weigh out the pros and cons of whether spending extra years studying will be worth your time to ultimately answer the main question:  what are the benefits? Why Postgraduate? Bryony Cosgrove, Head of Publishing and Communications at Melbourne University, said “the main benefits in terms of employability and rewards from further study in communications is that not only are the programs taught by industry practitioners, with broad-ranging industry links, but “Students gain from the hands-on approach to teaching and the exposure to industry experts in regular seminars, in guest lecture series and in the internship placements.” Indeed, postgraduate study equips students with a range of transferrable skills, from people skills, task skills to self-management skills as well as course/industry …